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How-To: Build a Hackintosh on the cheap

#1 User is offline   Macworld 

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 02:11 PM

Post your comments for How-To: Build a Hackintosh on the cheap here
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#2 User is offline   doglesby 

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 03:27 PM

Isn't that two Benji's and two Jacksons?
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#3 User is offline   robinh 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 12:14 AM

Would be interesting to know exactly which MSI motherboard the MSI Wind PC Barebones uses, as there are a few choices when it comes to the Intel 945GC. This is because buying the ready-made Barebones PC in the UK seems a bit tricky, so it might be easier to buy the components and do a DIY job.
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#4 User is offline   heisetax 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 12:31 AM

I'm going to check out what people have done with laptops. With Apple's apparent sealing of the 17" Intel MacBook Pro I'm now officially starting my look for a replacement for my 17" PowerBook.
I also may do some looking into the Hackintosh desktop unit. I have an Intel MacPro & would like to have an Intel back-up unit. I already have spare hard drives, track balls, key boards & optical drive.
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#5 User is offline   Fixx 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 12:58 AM

That thing might be a reasonable Mac Mini replacement. For light work only, of course.
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#6 User is offline   hayesk 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 08:08 AM

The more people start to build these Hackintoshes, the more likely Apple is to raise the price of MacOS X and include product activation. I don't know about you, but I'd rather Apple's developers work on features rather than activation. And I'd rather the price stay at $129.
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#7 User is offline   TeaEarleGreyHot 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 08:18 AM

As much as I hate sounding like a curmudgeon, I just need to point out that the few grammar and punctuation errors in this article significantly distract. I realize that in these tough times Macworld.com can't afford to pay a copy editor to review every article, and so I humbly suggest that authors be implored to re-read, proofread and doublecheck, so that their work enhances, rather than detracts from, Macworld.com's content.
Thank you.
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#8 User is offline   timcrawf 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 08:43 AM

What I really want is instructions for a Hackintosh using Mini type components. There are some nice small PC clone boxes that would make for a nice media center.
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#9 User is offline   bigh 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 08:48 AM

personally, I think the more people build Hackintoshes, the more they'll appreciate buying an Apple machine. I say that after building more than a dozen PCs of all sizes, including a couple of Hackintoshes. It's not for the faint of heart, nor a person who's time is valuable. In exchange for your effort, you're left with a machine that is usually noisy (especially the small form factor variety) and rarely elegant in its design. But worse, it often feels like computing on eggshells... If a program crashes or the network cuts out, is it the software or that .kext file you injected? Or maybe your BIOS settings? Or perhaps your UUID is wrong for the hard drive you set everything up on? The point is, there's an underlying uneasiness instead of the confidence a thoroughbred Mac brings. The uneasiness remains long after the thrill of rolling your own fades away.
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#10 User is offline   KGBguy 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 08:56 AM

It might be a news to many Americans here, but we ran OS X on a PC since the days of 10.2. And you don't need to spend 1000 USD about 400 is sufficient. And that Frankenmac is a stolen idea, more to that we have these days a Mac OS 10.5 that is ready to run on most Intel PC's, can be with SSC2, preferably SSC3.
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#11 User is offline   heisetax 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 08:57 AM

But the price used to be $99. So why was it raised? Was that because copies were not bing used on Mac Clones?

But what does activation mean to you any way. If everything you do is strictly legal as far as Apple legal sees it, then what do you have to loose other than a little time to activate your product.

Mac Clones are made because Apple is not filling a void(s) that are getting larger by the day. Most of these people will purchase the Mac OSbecause they do not want to take this income. Many would rather purchase Apple hardware, but there is no Apple hardware to satisfy their needs. Some just like the challenge to get any hardware & software to work. Changing to Intel just makes it easy enough to do. If this causes Apple to add activation, then just go outside Apple's paid channels & life will once again be easieer for you. I told that to a company that I was having trouble iwth, telling them that I wasn't being treated as good as those that did not purchase their product. They perked up & did their best to help me, a paying customer, to be able to use their product. If Apple goes the activation route it will hurt them & their loyal customers more than the people that they claim made them do the activation scheme.
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#12 User is offline   doglesby 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 09:10 AM

heisetax said:


But what does activation mean to you any way. If everything you do is strictly legal as far as Apple legal sees it, then what do you have to loose other than a little time to activate your product.

What activation means to people who've been paying attention is the disabling of the OS because you replaced your network card, or upgraded your video card, or even bought a larger hard drive. It means typing in activation codes. It means letting Apple decide the conditions under which something you paid for will function.

These so-called gaps are not widening, they are shrinking. The product grid has gone from 2 desktops and 2 laptops to 3 of each. What has widened is the sense of entitlement.
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#13 User is offline   doglesby 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 09:18 AM

heisetax said:


But the price used to be $99. So why was it raised?

From the Apple press release announcing the very first version of Mac OS X:
>Mac OS X will ship with 7 languages?English, Japanese, French, German, Spanish, Italian and Dutch? included on a single CD. In addition, the Mac OS X box will include a full copy of Mac OS 9.1, for running Classic applications, and the Mac OS X Developer Tools CD.
>
>Mac OS X will be available through The Apple Store? (www.apple.com) and through Apple Authorized Resellers for a suggested retail price of $129 (US) beginning March 24, 2001.
And that's 2001 dollars, Mac OS X is cheaper now.
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#14 User is offline   danmusician 

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 09:26 AM

heisetax said:



Quote

But what does activation mean to you any way. If everything you do is strictly legal as far as Apple legal sees it, then what do you have to loose other than a little time to activate your product.




As a legal user, I think activation schemes are fine when they work behind the scenes are are non-intrusive. But when the system doesn't work, it's a royal pain.

My daughter bought a Dell laptop for college. After a couple months, it wouldn't access the internet by any means - not ethernet, wireless or modem. After many attempts to fix it didn't work, we decided to wipe the HD clean and re-install everything. This meant that I had to re-authenticate the copy of Windows. However, I couldn't access the internet until I could re-install the drivers. So, I had to do a manual activation on the phone. This meant reading something like 6 fields of 6 or more digits to a computer over the phone. I can't tell you how many times I had to repeat the numbers because it didn't understand what I was saying. Then, the computer read back a new series of fields with numbers for me to enter. At the end of each field, it prompted me to say "next" or "repeat." I would repeat to make sure I had them correct before moving on. In the middle of this process, the computer on the other end of the phone froze. I had to hang up and start the ENTIRE process again. I was ready to throw the laptop against the wall at that point!

So yes, I think activation schemes are a terrible idea!
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