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ProSoft Data Rescue 3

#1 User is offline   Macworld 

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 03:31 AM

Post your comments for ProSoft Data Rescue 3 here
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#2 User is offline   CoasterFiend 

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 04:23 AM

"Ma" called on the first day of her vacation. She had deleted the GAMES folder on her iMac. Oh No! I "Logmein"ed, restored her GAMES folder, and she had a great time playing her games.
Works as advertised.
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#3 User is offline   Macbee4 

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 06:33 AM

I used this Application once and it took so long I could not believe it. So while this application allowed me to keep the dead hard disk on the desk top I then cloned it with carbon copy cloner to another hard disk. So the nice thing about this application is, it forces the hard disk to be scanned and then with the Macs multi tasking capabilities I could clone that disk while Data Rescue 3 was holding it on my desk top for me, so for that alone I'll give it 3 stars and I would give carbon copy cloner a 5 star rating. One cost a lot of cash the other is free. $99 is way too much, it's worth about $10.00.
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#4 User is offline   ldenning 

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 07:11 AM

A few years ago I had a main drive in serious technical trouble with major data corruption. This was the only software utility that I tried that could even begin to read the drive. It took many hours to complete, but virtually all my invaluable data was saved. It is very well worth the investment in my opinion.
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#5 User is online   davidanders 

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 09:08 AM

1Terabyte drive attempting to recover a thousand accidentally deleted camera raw photos. 25 hours resulted in only word doc files being listed. This was after Data Rescue II listed the CR2 files, but there was a failure in the destination hard drive.
File Salvage as able to recover 3700 CR2 and TIFF files after a 23 hour scan.
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#6 User is offline   douglasmcmorrow 

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 09:43 AM

There must be a better way. I had a 500Gb drive that I purchased for my MacBook Pro in January 2009. Last month the drive started "clicking" and then it failed to mount. A quick scan showed me that my directory was corrupted. Wanting to recover everything, I also used the deep scan method which took no less than 26 hours to complete. MAJOR PROBLEM. The program told me I needed five terabytes of free space to recover everything off my 500 gigabyte drive. During the year and a half this drive was working I copied and deleted thousands of applications, videos and photographs on to/off of this drive. Unfortunately, I never zeroed-out the free space on my drive, so this deep scan wants to recover literally millions of partial files that could be as small as 10k, 5k, or 1k. This recovery effort has been put on the back burner until a get a larger hard drive and the time necessary to select the files I would like to recover.
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#7 User is offline   byundt 

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 10:17 AM

I had an unbootable 320 GB laptop drive with damaged sectors in the file allocation table area and elsewhere. DiskWarrior failed because it timed out due to the damaged sectors. I then tried to clone the drive using Data Rescue 3. Word to the wise: make sure that you turn off the energy saver options to display a screen saver or turn off the computer after a period of inactivity. Without that step (booting from the Data Rescue CD), data recovery failed after 220 hours of trying (the last 10 GB had a lot of corruption). With that precaution (booting from the replacement hard drive), a full clone succeeded after running overnight. I was then able to use DiskWarrior to rebuild the directory and recover almost all my files.
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#8 User is offline   bigh 

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 09:22 PM

I agree with ProSoft themselves... Data Rescue *is* a last resort. If it's not a hardware problem, you should first always try to reconstruct the directory on a corrupted drive (using something like Disk Warrior). If the directory can be reconstructed, your data will be recovered in a MUCH more usable way. If the directory is unsalvageable, Data Rescue can probably salvage the files, but they may not be recognizable, meaning they likely won't have meaningful file names, and will be scattered amongst a multitude of meaningless files.

A real-world example: I recently had a colleague whose single laptop drive failed (and who didn't have a backup strategy). I used both DiskWarrior and Data Rescue to make sure he had everything on the drive. DiskWarrior was able to (relatively) quickly rebuild the directory and recover his files, in folders and with names just like he had them arranged. There weren't any system files, program graphics, etc. Data Rescue recovered the files as well, but took much longer, salvaged a lot of meaningless files, and put them all in numbered folders, often with numbers instead of names. Scattered amongst an astonishing number of meaningless cache files, logs, program graphics, etc. Sorting through these sorts of files on a modern drive to find useful files is a daunting task.

I compared it to a tornado hitting a library. Data Rescue will find every page of every book that's scattered around, but often won't be able to put the books back together. A program like Disk Warrior will start with salvaging the card catalog (remember those?), and as it finds pages, it uses the card catalog to put them back in the books, resulting in a room full of ordered books instead of a mountain of loose pages. Plus it's much (4x or more) faster.

Both have their place, and it's worth having both at hand. But start with software like Disk Warrior, and use Data Rescue as a last resort. The $100 for Disk Warrior is well spent since it will save you untold hours sorting and assembling everything. In the story cited above, my colleague never touched the Data Rescue files... everything he needed was in the Disk Warrior files, named and in folders like he left them. And he now has a backup drive (the best solution of all... backups and archives... but this wisdom comes to most only after a dramatic event like the failure of a drive).

btw, if the drive has a significant mechanical error (rare), you'll have no choice but to send the disk off to somewhere like DriveSavers, which will cost thousands. But it's well worth the time and money to try Disk Warrior and Data Rescue first (roughly $100 each).
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#9 User is offline   dholt303 

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 02:21 PM

Hi there,

My name is David and I'm with Prosoft Customer Support.

There could be a few reasons for this, as explained below.

When you do a Deep scan, Data Rescue uses two different algorithms to locate files. These methods will often locate many of the same files twice – once under the Found Files folder and again under the Reconstructed Files folder. So if you elect to recover everything, it will often be the case that the total space required exceeds the original media size.

The second reason why the found files may total more than expected is the possibility of anomalously (and incorrectly) large files. In the course of scanning the media, Data Rescue will often come across bad files and catalog entries. Data Rescue is able to filter out the vast majority of these bad entries, but not all of them. Occasionally a few of these may show up in the recovery list with incorrect and large sizes. If you suspect this may be the case, you can easily find these large files by searching for files greater than a certain size using the Edit  Find menu item. A useful technique to eliminate these from the recovery is: first mark everything by clicking the checkbox for the top level folders, then search for and uncheck the large files which appear to be bogus.

A third possible reason is if the scanned drive makes heavy use of hard linked files, such as a Time Machine backup drive. Hard linked files are used by Time Machine to store many copies of the same file with the same content, without duplicating the contents. The current version of Data Rescue 3 sees and recovers such files as individual files and does not share space among the files when recovering. For example, if there are 20 hard links to a 1MB file on the original disk, and you recover all 20 links, the recovered files will each take 1MB, or a total of 20MB. The best approach for this case is to select a single set of files to recover, such as the latest Time Machine backup folders rather than attempting to recover everything.

Feel free to contact our Support department at 925-426-6306 between 7AM and 5PM PST Monday to Friday if you have any further questions.
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#10 User is offline   dholt303 

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 02:27 PM

View Postbigh, on 12 July 2010 - 09:22 PM, said:

I agree with ProSoft themselves... Data Rescue *is* a last resort. If it's not a hardware problem, you should first always try to reconstruct the directory on a corrupted drive (using something like Disk Warrior). If the directory can be reconstructed, your data will be recovered in a MUCH more usable way. If the directory is unsalvageable, Data Rescue can probably salvage the files, but they may not be recognizable, meaning they likely won't have meaningful file names, and will be scattered amongst a multitude of meaningless files...


Hi there,

My name is David from Prosoft Engineering.

Regarding the issue of file names - it depends upon where in the scan results you look for files and also depends upon the scan type that was used, and what initially happened to the files or drive that required the use of Data Rescue 3. In the following scenario we are going to assume the drive is corrupted and no longer mounts, but no files had been trashed. The Deep Scan method is what would commonly be used in this scenario.

After a Deep Scan of the drive, there are two parts to the scan results. First is listed the Reconstructed files. This is where Data Rescue 3 would sort out files that are no longer referenced in the file catalog, and thus found by their content. Such files would be previously deleted files, or files that have been completely de-referenced in the file catalog due to corruption. Data Rescue 3 organizes the files here by their content. When files are emptied from the trash as is the most common scenario requiring recovery from Reconstructed files, all of the information pertaining to the file ( filename, parent directory and all associated metadata) is removed from the file catalog by the Mac Operating System and permanently lost. At this point no software can recover the original filenames. Data Rescue 3 reconstructs these files from known patterns and sorts them out according to their file type. We place the Reconstructed files folder in the scan results after a Deep Scan so that if any file catalog corruption exists, files can still be recovered by their content if necessary.

Certain file types may contain embedded data that can be useful as a filename, but most do not.

The second part of the scan results is the Found Files. Inside Found Files is where you would look to find files sorted by the original file catalog locations. All file names, paths, parent and sub-folder names are represented here as best as can be found in the file catalog. There is a sub-section here for Orphaned files, files that have lost their parent folder information due again to file catalog corruption on the drive.

We encourage our customers to contact our Support department at 925-426-6306, or via email to support@prosofteng.com if they have any questions. Additionally a trouble ticket can be opened by our customers from the Support page on our website:

http://www.prosofteng.com/support

Our hours for support are listed on our website - we're open for Support from 7AM to 5PM PST Monday through Friday.

Please don't hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.
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#11 User is offline   keepitsimple 

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 07:09 AM

Data Rescue 3 worked very well for me on a hard drive that the computer store could not mount/recover with their software tools.
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#12 User is offline   jesseortega 

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 10:45 AM

I recently used data rescue 3. worked fine at first. i was able to retreive all the files that were wiped away. but once i got them back and tried to use them on my computer, a little message would pop up for every file that would say either ''unknown format'' or ''file is corrupt or a file format that this program doesnt recognize'' . does anybody know why this would happen? thanks!
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#13 User is offline   Higgs 

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 12:51 PM

Thanks for the review, waiting to test this app - want to check it with my USB drive - I've deleted my photos by mistake and hope this app can recover them back:)

I've also heard of Disk Drill (http://www.cleverfiles.com/) release (seems like it is in beta now) - do you have its testing in plans? Looks interesting as well.
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