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How to enable Target Disk Mode via Thunderbolt

#15 User is offline   Udgaard 

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 01:58 AM

Hi Whitedog
Thank's for the enlightenment. However it still amazes my why Apple would impair innovative use of their computers. Rather, enhancing this, should be a continuous concern.
I would assume that the Thunderbolt technique would enable some relative simple ways of combining two machines, yet I can not even use my MacBook Pro as an additional screen when I am editing video in my iMac. This certainty doesn’t reflect the intelligence, which Apple likes to be associated with.
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#16 User is offline   whitedog 

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 02:40 PM

View PostUdgaard, on 04 March 2012 - 01:58 AM, said:

Hi Whitedog
Thank's for the enlightenment. However it still amazes my why Apple would impair innovative use of their computers. Rather, enhancing this, should be a continuous concern.
I would assume that the Thunderbolt technique would enable some relative simple ways of combining two machines, yet I can not even use my MacBook Pro as an additional screen when I am editing video in my iMac. This certainty doesn’t reflect the intelligence, which Apple likes to be associated with.


Thunderbolt is so powerful that we are taken aback when we find it has limitations. These limitations may or may not be overcome in future iterations - it's hard to say because the technology is not well understood, certainly not by laymen like me. But it turns out even those who are endeavoring to develop TB enabled hardware are finding it more complicated than they expected, which is why release dates have been repeatedly pushed back by some manufacturers. This is not actually unusual for a new technology, which, in this case, was only finalized by Intel about a year ago.

But what you are talking about, ganging computers together to increase resources additively, has never been possible on any platform and is not a function of limitations in TB - or any other connectivity technology. It's in the nature of the computer hardware itself. Individual computer resources are managed by the CPU and other features of the motherboard architecture - on that computer. Imagine, if you will, two automobiles side by side. It would be possible to put a robot controller in one car so that whatever the driver did in the other car would be mirrored by the first, operating without a driver of its own. While the cars might then accelerate at the same speed and even turn the same, the second car could not increase the potential speed of the first. Indeed, it might actually slow things down as the single driver would have to divide his attention between the two cars. This is an inexact analogy but should give some idea of the issues involved. You could operate both cars remotely and have them go at different speeds and in different directions. This is somewhat like what has long been possible with multiple computers, operating in parallel. The more cars you have running together remotely the more complex the control device would have to be - which is a stand-in for the software that now runs computers in parallel.

To address the issue you raise, about getting more computer power out of a single unit, hardware developers like Intel have continually worked to increased the capabilities of the various components used in computers. And they developed a system that imitates the combination of computers by developing CPU chips with multiple cores and controllers that can manage two chips with multiple cores at the same time. Even so, these cores operate in parallel. With software optimized to take advantage of this parallel processing you can get a lot more work done in a shorter period of time, yet the individual CPU cores still have speed limits that are not enhanced by the presence of other cores. Another advantage of multiple cores is that you can run more programs, more efficiently, at the same time.

And, as computers have gotten more capable CPUs, the amount of RAM - and the quality of the RAM - they can use has grown substantially. Graphics processors have also gotten better. Data rates have been increased by improvements in the bus technology that carries the data back and forth from the hard drive. Perhaps the biggest leap in performance has been provided by Solid State Drives (SSDs), though these have far less storage capacity than conventional hard drives and are still much more expensive.

At one time there was a lot of competition between computer chip makers to see who could produce the fastest chip, the so-called megahertz war. But there turned out to be finite limits to how fast a chip could go. So hardware and software developers took a different approach, building CPUs with multiple cores and software that can use parallel processing to do more work. The solution you envision has never been feasible and, frankly, has never been necessary. It has nothing to do with Apple not innovating nor with any lack of intelligence on their part. To put it politely, what you are looking for is an infeasible solution in search of a nonexistent problem. If I may suggest, you need to learn more about how computers work so that your expectations may more closely align with reality. There is no surer road to disappointment than unrealistic expectations.
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#17 User is offline   Denny 

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  Posted 15 April 2012 - 10:02 AM

I'm trying to boot up a MacBook Air in Target Disk Mode to connect to a 2011 MacBook Pro with a Thunderbolt cable that I bought yesterday, but without success. I can boot up the MacBook Air in Target Mode, but the Target Mode does NOT appear in the Startup Disk preference panel. And when it does boot up, although I see the Thunderbolt icon moving across the screen, its hard disk does not appear on the MacBook Pro's desktop. What's wrong????
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#18 User is offline   Martian 

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 12:09 PM

Quote

Slide 4: "Other that that, Target Disk Mode works just the same as before, so for those who are familiar with it, you shouldn’t miss a beat."

Well if you have a MacBook Air (has Thunderbolt but no Firewire) and if your other Macs are fairly recent and bristling with Firewire ports but just not quite new enough to have Thunderbolt, then you will "miss a beat" and continue to miss those beats until you upgrade at least one of your other slightly older non-Thunderbolt Macs.
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#19 User is offline   DemetriAlekseev 

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  Posted 13 July 2012 - 06:48 AM

I use Target Disk Mode every day. When not at work, my system is a MacBook Pro. When at work, my system might be a quad core iMac or it might be a octacore MacPro... yet my "system" never changes as I boot in TDM from the MacBook Pro regardless. I suffer a little on disk speed (until I get SSD) but I make up for it in flexibility and raw processor power.

With TDM on Thunderbolt, I am whole hog going for a Retina MBP!
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#20 User is offline   yanez1971 

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  Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:18 AM

HELP NEEDED: HARD DRIVE NOT SHOWING UP IN TARGET DISK MODE.
I have recently upgraded a 1-year old iMac to Mountain Lion performing a clean install. Unfortunately, the one that made the back-up missed to backup the user library. So, I installed Data Rescue 3 on my new MacBook Pro in order to try to recover the most that I can.
The iMac does not have thunderbolt and the new MBP does not have Firewire port anymore, so I connected them via a new Firewire Cable + Thunderbolt adapter.
After having re-booted with Target Disk Mode the iMac, its Hard Drive does not show up on my MBP: I have tried several times, even opening System Utilities on MBP it does not appear.
So I searched through Google and there I only found that the procedure I made was correct.
HAS ANYONE ENCOUNTERED AND SOLVED A SIMILAR ISSUE?
Many thanks in advance.
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#21 User is offline   whitedog 

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 05:29 PM

View Postyanez1971, on 30 July 2013 - 11:18 AM, said:

HELP NEEDED: HARD DRIVE NOT SHOWING UP IN TARGET DISK MODE.
I have recently upgraded a 1-year old iMac to Mountain Lion performing a clean install. Unfortunately, the one that made the back-up missed to backup the user library. So, I installed Data Rescue 3 on my new MacBook Pro in order to try to recover the most that I can.
The iMac does not have thunderbolt and the new MBP does not have Firewire port anymore, so I connected them via a new Firewire Cable + Thunderbolt adapter.
After having re-booted with Target Disk Mode the iMac, its Hard Drive does not show up on my MBP: I have tried several times, even opening System Utilities on MBP it does not appear.
So I searched through Google and there I only found that the procedure I made was correct.
HAS ANYONE ENCOUNTERED AND SOLVED A SIMILAR ISSUE?
Many thanks in advance.


Several months ago Apple released a Thunderbolt target disk mode fix. Check out this Apple Insider article for more info: http://appleinsider....oftware-update. You need at least OS X 10.8.3 to use the update.
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