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How to rip audio from your Blu-ray discs

#1 User is offline   Macworld 

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 05:01 AM

Post your comments for How to rip audio from your Blu-ray discs here
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#2 User is offline   b00le 

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  Posted 13 July 2011 - 07:57 AM

I'm curious - can you open the mkv files using QuickTime 7 with the Perian codec? (You can with the mkv files I have seen. I then save reference mov files to the Movies folder, which streamlines the interaction with Front Row.) If so, you should be able to use QuickTime 7 to export the soundtrack...
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#3 User is offline   DVA_Airwolf 

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  Posted 13 July 2011 - 09:29 AM

Would Audio Hijack not just do the job for you?
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#4 User is offline   kirkmc 

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 09:32 AM

View PostDVA_Airwolf, on 13 July 2011 - 09:29 AM, said:

Would Audio Hijack not just do the job for you?


Sure, but that converts the digital to analog and back to digital again. There's not a huge loss in quality, but there is some. Also, it's real-time recording (though given the time it takes to rip a Blu-ray, it might not be that much longer to record).
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#5 User is offline   Deromax 

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  Posted 13 July 2011 - 09:47 AM

I'm prety sure Audio Hijack do not re-record from analog, but intercept the digital stream on its way to the Audio Out hardware.
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#6 User is offline   kirkmc 

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 09:55 AM

View Postb00le, on 13 July 2011 - 07:57 AM, said:

I'm curious - can you open the mkv files using QuickTime 7 with the Perian codec? (You can with the mkv files I have seen. I then save reference mov files to the Movies folder, which streamlines the interaction with Front Row.) If so, you should be able to use QuickTime 7 to export the soundtrack...


Well, it turns out that I'm running REDACTED on my iMac right now, and there is no QT 7, only QuickTime Player. This can export audio only, but there's no choice of format, bit rate or anything else.

So I went to try and export a 33-minute segment with QT Player. After taking a few minutes to open the 6 GB file, it took about ten minutes, after I chose "Export," to start to do anything, then gave me an estimated time of about 21 hours… So I'm not convinced that it is the best solution.

When I dug out a copy of QT 7 (good thing I had one), it did, indeed, export very quickly to AIFF. But there was no sound. When I went to play the MKV file in QT7, there was no sound either.

View PostDeromax, on 13 July 2011 - 09:47 AM, said:

I'm prety sure Audio Hijack do not re-record from analog, but intercept the digital stream on its way to the Audio Out hardware.


Of course it doesn't. It uses the "analog hole."

This post has been edited by kirkmc: 13 July 2011 - 09:54 AM

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#7 User is offline   Deromax 

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  Posted 13 July 2011 - 11:14 AM

I'm affraid you're wrong on this. Why would you have to specify which application to hijack if it were recording the analog output? How would you record multiple applications at once to separates files via the pre-mixed analog output?

But you don't have to believe me, read it for yoursefl here : http://www.bestshare...-hijack-pro.htm

Lower half of the page.
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#8 User is offline   flowney 

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  Posted 13 July 2011 - 12:23 PM

QuickTime 7.6.6 (Pro) works just fine under Lion although it is not part of the Lion install nor is it brought over by Migration Assistant. I simply retrieved my copy from my 10.6.8 install.
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#9 User is offline   stuntmanleg0 

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  Posted 13 July 2011 - 12:34 PM

I've seen quite a few of these articles lately all proposing this awkward and flaky solutions that frustrated me for weeks. Then I found this: http://pavtube.com/ and now ripping a Blu-Ray is even easier than any of my DVD ripping solutions. I don't know why NO ONE seems to know about it.
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#10 User is offline   MichlAtchisong6fh 

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  Posted 13 July 2011 - 12:44 PM

Seems like an easier (and probably even faster) way would be to record the audio in real-time using QuickTime Player. I do this all the time (albeit not with Blu-Ray discs). This method would be way cheaper if you don't already have a Blu-Ray drive for your Mac--just directly connect the audio tracks on your home theater Blu-Ray player to your Mac. You can choose between digital and analog (analog requires cheaper cables, arguably reduced sound quality).
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#11 User is offline   georose 

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  Posted 13 July 2011 - 12:46 PM

Unfortunately for music lovers, the Blu-Ray music that I have listened to sound much better with the higher def sound tracks than with the PCM sound tracks the author copied. Another "bag of hurt". One consolation, the music is usually available in another format CD or download. While sound quality is an issue with downloads or streaming, most people don't seem to care. At least that is what Apple's marketing has shown.
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#12 User is offline   kirkmc 

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 02:00 PM

View Postgeorose, on 13 July 2011 - 12:46 PM, said:

Unfortunately for music lovers, the Blu-Ray music that I have listened to sound much better with the higher def sound tracks than with the PCM sound tracks the author copied. Another "bag of hurt". One consolation, the music is usually available in another format CD or download. While sound quality is an issue with downloads or streaming, most people don't seem to care. At least that is what Apple's marketing has shown.


Actually, the two discs I ripped had 24/48 PCM files.
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#13 User is offline   georose 

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 10:55 PM

View Postkirkmc, on 13 July 2011 - 02:00 PM, said:

View Postgeorose, on 13 July 2011 - 12:46 PM, said:

Unfortunately for music lovers, the Blu-Ray music that I have listened to sound much better with the higher def sound tracks than with the PCM sound tracks the author copied. Another "bag of hurt". One consolation, the music is usually available in another format CD or download. While sound quality is an issue with downloads or streaming, most people don't seem to care. At least that is what Apple's marketing has shown.


Actually, the two discs I ripped had 24/48 PCM files.


A good point. Both the PCM and multichannel tracks can be at a higher bit rate. I'm still waiting for the higher bit rates to translate into better sound. There I go, sounding like an AAC fanboy! Yet, it seems to me that 5.1 channel, and the lack of lossy compression with the new 5.1 channel on Blu-Ray usually trumps 2.0 PCM on same disc in a big way. Maybe better DAC's could reveal significant gains for the high bit rate PCM choice. I do have some vinyl and CD that can do an impressive job on my high end audio system so I don't think the major difference is only 5.1 vs 2.0 for quality. BTW - I haven't found every Blu-Ray to have the greatest sound regardless of bit rate. Maybe the recording engineers can take advantage of higher resolution in the future. I doubt it, based on the majority of new recordings I have listened to regardless of format.
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#14 User is offline   fellersmtc 

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  Posted 14 July 2011 - 06:10 AM

Ok fine, so now how about extracting the Dolby Digital or DTS 5.1 (or pcm) soundtrack (such as from a concert) and wrapping that into a Quicktime container so that it will playback 5.1 over the Apple TV.
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