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Master the hidden power of your camera's program mode

#1 User is offline   Macworld 

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 05:31 AM

Post your comments for Master the hidden power of your camera's program mode here
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#2 User is offline   henryhbk 

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  Posted 21 July 2011 - 06:30 AM

And typically (at least on the canon DSLRs) this is how you produce RAW images, as auto shoots JPEG.
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#3 User is offline   macFanDave 

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  Posted 21 July 2011 - 06:52 AM

Just a little quibble: A is the symbol for Aperture-priority mode, while the Automatic mode is denoted by "Auto." It took me a minute to sort this out, but now I am excited to get back home to my camera and try out some of these tips.
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#4 User is offline   flybynight 

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  Posted 21 July 2011 - 07:08 AM

"If you want to slow the shutter speed to introduce motion blur, there's no need to switch to Shutter Priority; just spin the dial (or press the arrows or rocker switch) in Program mode. Likewise, if you want to increase the depth of field, move the controls in the opposite direction."
You've got that a bit backwards. If you are lengthening the shutter speed to introduce motion blur, Program mode will compensate by reducing the size of the aperture (higher aperture number), which will increase your depth of field. So, if you want to increase the depth of field, keep going in the SAME direction. If you want a shallow depth of field, then move the controls in the opposite direction.
Also, just to be picky, usually the "big A" on the dial is not Auto mode, but Aperture Priority mode. In the image at the top of the article, this is the case. All manufacturers are a little different, but I'd say it's more reliably "the green one" - could be a green "A" or a green box, or like in the image shown, the word "AUTO" in green.
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#5 User is offline   jakecross 

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  Posted 21 July 2011 - 09:37 AM

Not sure about stills photogs, but some video professionals call it "Auto Auto" to imply that the camera is in full-auto mode (focus, shutter, iris/aperture, everything).
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#6 User is offline   wardoggie 

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 10:39 AM

Quote

I occasionally teach digital photography workshops, and one of the first questions I ask my students is what exposure mode they use. Often, I'll hear, "I usually set it on auto and leave it there." But when I look at their camera, I find it's set on Program mode, not Auto.

Ha, I'm the opposite; I never use Program mode because it sounds complicated. I use Auto, Shutter or Aperture modes 90% of the time. And if I don't want a flash, I set it to "no flash". This article has inspired me to go through the manual more to find out what these things do :)
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#7 User is offline   John__B 

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  Posted 21 July 2011 - 11:49 AM

P is for professional. LOL!

Learn to read your camera's exposure meter and then you can shoot in aperture or shutter priority (and override that at will) or even manual mode.

For reasons I'll never understand, there seems to be this fear of manual mode, as if you are somehow totally left to your own devices. You still have access to the same exposure meter information (i.e. over/underexposure measured in bars) in manual mode as you get in any of the other modes and that will still respond appropriately as you make changes to the aperture value, shutter speed, or ISO.
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#8 User is offline   bonaccij 

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  Posted 21 July 2011 - 05:43 PM

A stands for auto? That's funny. Every camera I've ever used it stands for Aperture Priority... who is this guy?
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#9 User is offline   morfeomatrixx 

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 02:03 PM

View Postbonaccij, on 21 July 2011 - 05:43 PM, said:

A stands for auto? That's funny. Every camera I've ever used it stands for Aperture Priority... who is this guy?


Agree... actually I've got more accurate and useful info from these posts than from the article/author itself !
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#10 User is offline   wiggums 

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Posted 24 July 2011 - 10:55 AM

View Postmorfeomatrixx, on 22 July 2011 - 02:03 PM, said:

View Postbonaccij, on 21 July 2011 - 05:43 PM, said:

A stands for auto? That's funny. Every camera I've ever used it stands for Aperture Priority... who is this guy?


Agree... actually I've got more accurate and useful info from these posts than from the article/author itself !

A usually stands for Auto. Av is for Aperture priority or Aperture Value,
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#11 User is offline   jhwalker 

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 05:03 AM

View Postwiggums, on 24 July 2011 - 10:55 AM, said:

View Postmorfeomatrixx, on 22 July 2011 - 02:03 PM, said:

View Postbonaccij, on 21 July 2011 - 05:43 PM, said:

A stands for auto? That's funny. Every camera I've ever used it stands for Aperture Priority... who is this guy?


Agree... actually I've got more accurate and useful info from these posts than from the article/author itself !

A usually stands for Auto. Av is for Aperture priority or Aperture Value,


No, "A" does *not* usually stand for "Auto". "A" *usually* standards for Aperture priority - Canon is the *only* camera maker who uses the confusing "Av" abbreviation, and even they generally spell out "Auto". As always, there are some oddballs out there, but this is pretty close to universal.
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#12 User is offline   ericforat 

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 08:25 AM

Well, I see on my Panasonic LX5 that there is a "P"(Program mode), "A" (aperture priority) and "S"(speed priority), and the real Auto is called:"IA"(Intelligent Auto)! So that's still another name...
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#13 User is offline   KCMarshvknt 

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  Posted 27 July 2011 - 03:28 PM

To Whom It May Inspire: I can't tell you how great it was to finally get into using my camera in manual mode. The key was learning how my meter worked and how to adjust aperture/shutter speed to compensate (also ISO). I highly reccomend reading up on how your camera meters light. I've shot on Canon 5Ds, own a Panasonic GH2 (LOVE IT) and several other cameras and they don't all meter the same way (or display in the same manner). It's SO worth knowing and unlocks all kinds of creative possibilities. For me forcing myself to go on an outing with my camera also helped. You just keep shooting/adjusting/reviewing/repeat. I have also designated myself "photographer" for my friends kid's parties since I don't have kids and that's been an excellent and low pressure way to practice. Plus, if you get a few good ones it means the world to your friends who likely don't have nice cameras (or don't know how to use them) or are only shooting on iPhones, etc.

To Whom It May Inspire: I can't tell you how great it was to finally get into using my camera in manual mode. The key was learning how my meter worked and how to adjust aperture/shutter speed to compensate (also ISO). I highly reccomend reading up on how your camera meters light. I've shot on Canon 5Ds, own a Panasonic GH2 (LOVE IT) and several other cameras and they don't all meter the same way (or display in the same manner). It's SO worth knowing and unlocks all kinds of creative possibilities. For me forcing myself to go on an outing with my camera also helped. You just keep shooting/adjusting/reviewing/repeat. I have also designated myself "photographer" for my friends kid's parties since I don't have kids and that's been an excellent and low pressure way to practice. Plus, if you get a few good ones it means the world to your friends who likely don't have nice cameras (or don't know how to use them) or are only shooting on iPhones, etc. Good luck everyone!

Please excuse duplicate post!
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