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Apple takes innovative approach to Flashback malware removal

#1 User is offline   Macworld 

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 12:51 PM

Post your comments for Apple takes innovative approach to Flashback malware removal here
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#2 User is offline   MrMcLargeHuge 

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  Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:17 PM

How about an uninstaller for Java? One does not currently exist for OS X!
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#3 User is offline   Salvo 

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  Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:24 PM

I wonder if this will work on machines that have been corrupted by Kaspersky's and Norton's incompetent attempts at providing a Third Party Solution.

http://www.macworld....s_the_fray.html

I expect Kaspersky and Norton to sue Apple for AntiTrust violations like how Trend Micro has to Microsoft.
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#4 User is offline   BrianMeyer 

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  Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:24 PM

How about the same feature for flash, i really wish i had a check box to enable and disable just flash. ( was happy when i first saw the disable plugins checkbox in safari, just check when needed, and remember to uncheck )
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#5 User is offline   jerseid 

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  Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:45 PM

Ummm, Last time I checked Facebook, Charles Schwab, and a bucket full of other websites do not function well or at all without Java enabled. So yes turning it off if users do not use it is "innovative" I guess but for the most part Java is heavily used for day to day internet usage. Sandboxing Safari and other web browsers makes much more sense and is far more innovative. Also, I thought the story was something of satire by starting off with "Better late than never?" and then the whole "Wolfgang Kandek" being impressed made me start laughing. I think in order for this problem to be solved users are going to have to start educating themselves.
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#6 User is offline   kmdean 

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:54 PM

View Postjerseid, on 13 April 2012 - 01:45 PM, said:

Ummm, Last time I checked Facebook, Charles Schwab, and a bucket full of other websites do not function well or at all without Java enabled. ...for the most part Java is heavily used for day to day internet usage.


Don't confuse Java and Javascript. They're completely different unrelated languages and Javascript is the one the prevalent across the internet.
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#7 User is offline   klahanas 

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:00 PM

View PostSalvo, on 13 April 2012 - 01:24 PM, said:

I wonder if this will work on machines that have been corrupted by Kaspersky's and Norton's incompetent attempts at providing a Third Party Solution.

http://www.macworld....s_the_fray.html

I expect Kaspersky and Norton to sue Apple for AntiTrust violations like how Trend Micro has to Microsoft.

Kaspersky's first attempt, I agree. What did Norton do?
"One likes to believe in the freedom of music,
But glittering prizes and endless compromises
Shatter the illusion of integrity."

-Rush
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#8 User is offline   Dillon 

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:07 PM

Try ClickToFlash. It disables Flash on websites until you click on the area or enable Flash for a site.
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#9 User is offline   bmg43 

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:15 PM

View PostBrianMeyer, on 13 April 2012 - 01:24 PM, said:

How about the same feature for flash, i really wish i had a check box to enable and disable just flash. ( was happy when i first saw the disable plugins checkbox in safari, just check when needed, and remember to uncheck )
Yes, as fellow writer Dillon has suggested, you can download the free plugin Click to Flash for Safari which will allow you to turn on or turn off flash content on a web page. I've used it for years and find it really helpful.
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#10 User is offline   redgeminipa 

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  Posted 13 April 2012 - 03:46 PM

People bashing Apple for their lax approach on this need to look at themselves a little harder. I'll admit that I even browse some porn sites, and I wasn't infected by this.

Why? Call it being a smart browser. I'll say what I've been telling people for years: STOP CLICKING ON THE SPARKLEY BANNERS ON WEBSITES! If you don't know what the link is, DON'T CLICK IT.

Sadly, even smart browsing doesn't help Windows users who aren't protected.
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#11 User is offline   mc4o1993 

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 04:19 PM

View PostBrianMeyer, on 13 April 2012 - 01:24 PM, said:

How about the same feature for flash, i really wish i had a check box to enable and disable just flash. ( was happy when i first saw the disable plugins checkbox in safari, just check when needed, and remember to uncheck )


remove flash from your machine. use Chrome as your player (it's built in, and dies with the browser).

seems like just having Flash installed slows down the machine.
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#12 User is offline   Martian 

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 04:51 PM

Apple's condescending lack of communication is so aggravating. When Apple finally gets off its ass and fixes Java (two risky months late), Apple doesn't bother to tell the user that Java will be turned off if not used in the last 35 days. I rarely use Java on my laptop, so I figured I had nothing to lose by using that laptop to test if the Java update would screw up the proprietary Java based banking software I must use. The update did shut off Java but then gave me no indication as to why the banking software was now failing. Fortunately, I later read this article and now know that I can update my Mac Pro without losing the proprietary software.

That's kind of like how the airlines keep their customers in the dark

This post has been edited by Martian: 13 April 2012 - 04:52 PM

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#13 User is offline   Stewsburntmonkey 

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 05:16 PM

View PostMartian, on 13 April 2012 - 04:51 PM, said:

Apple's condescending lack of communication is so aggravating. When Apple finally gets off its ass and fixes Java (two risky months late), Apple doesn't bother to tell the user that Java will be turned off if not used in the last 35 days. I rarely use Java on my laptop, so I figured I had nothing to lose by using that laptop to test if the Java update would screw up the proprietary Java based banking software I must use. The update did shut off Java but then gave me no indication as to why the banking software was now failing. Fortunately, I later read this article and now know that I can update my Mac Pro without losing the proprietary software.

That's kind of like how the airlines keep their customers in the dark


What lack of communication? The patch notes specifically state that the update disables automatic execution of Java if it hasn't been used for an extended period.
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#14 User is offline   whitedog 

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  Posted 13 April 2012 - 05:38 PM

There are other aspects of Apple’s solution that are innovative. The latest Java update included tools to remove infected files; then the tools removed themselves as well. This means the same method may be used again to deal with future infections without the risk of duplicate files and apps cluttering up the system. This is possible, of course, because the Java update patched (however belatedly) the vulnerability to this specific trojan, so once used, the removal tools are no longer needed. Whether a future infection vector will follow this same pattern we have no way of knowing, but the possibility certainly exists. Apple’s solution is eminently tidy. What’s more, it’s available to anyone who is wise enough to keep their software up-to-date. Hopefully next time it won’t take Apple three months and three tries to solve the problem.
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