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Replacing MacBook Pro 2008 model for a 2012 model I want to end up with the new MacBook Pro being exactly like the older

#1 User is offline   GeronimoJackson 

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 04:58 PM

February 15, 2013
Greetings my fellow Macsters,

I have been a mac enthusiast since OS7. I went through everything through OS9 until Steve (may he rest in peace) put it to rest and brought out OS X Jaguar. All of that over a few years or so on a PowerPC.

In 2008 I went to OS X on a MacBook Pro. I replaced the hard drive a couple of years ago to get more storage space. I put in an Hitachi 7200 rpm 750 GB. This gives me plenty of space and has so far been a reliable unit. I also changed out the memory to 4 GB.

I have just purchased a new MacBook Pro with an SSD of 250GB. This not near enough storage for everything that I have on my older MacBook Pro.

I have ordered a new Hitachi 7200 rpm with 1 Terabyte of storage. My plan is to remove the 250 GB SSD which contains OSX 10.8.2 and put in the new empty Hitachi hard drive. I have a new drive enclosure that I will put the SSD into.

So, now I need to get everything from the older laptop onto the new one. The older OS is up to date with 10.8.2. There is somewhere on the machines a way to transfer from one to the other. Migration assistant. I’ve been thinking, will that work? Will the OS transfer with everything. Maybe I need to transfer the information on the SSD on to the new HD, then transfer data from old to new. I don’t imagine it actually transfers the data, more than likely it copies it.

Once everything is transferred I should be able to swap out the older laptop with the new one and see no change except what ever the new hardware will provide.

Tell me what you think about all this. When all is said and done, I want the new laptop to be exactly as the old one. Geronimo Jackson beastworks@mac.com
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#2 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 10:31 PM

View PostGeronimoJackson, on 15 February 2013 - 04:58 PM, said:

February 15, 2013
Greetings my fellow Macsters,

I have been a mac enthusiast since OS7. I went through everything through OS9 until Steve (may he rest in peace) put it to rest and brought out OS X Jaguar. All of that over a few years or so on a PowerPC.

In 2008 I went to OS X on a MacBook Pro. I replaced the hard drive a couple of years ago to get more storage space. I put in an Hitachi 7200 rpm 750 GB. This gives me plenty of space and has so far been a reliable unit. I also changed out the memory to 4 GB.

I have just purchased a new MacBook Pro with an SSD of 250GB. This not near enough storage for everything that I have on my older MacBook Pro.

I have ordered a new Hitachi 7200 rpm with 1 Terabyte of storage. My plan is to remove the 250 GB SSD which contains OSX 10.8.2 and put in the new empty Hitachi hard drive. I have a new drive enclosure that I will put the SSD into.

So, now I need to get everything from the older laptop onto the new one. The older OS is up to date with 10.8.2. There is somewhere on the machines a way to transfer from one to the other. Migration assistant. I’ve been thinking, will that work? Will the OS transfer with everything. Maybe I need to transfer the information on the SSD on to the new HD, then transfer data from old to new. I don’t imagine it actually transfers the data, more than likely it copies it.

Once everything is transferred I should be able to swap out the older laptop with the new one and see no change except what ever the new hardware will provide.

Tell me what you think about all this. When all is said and done, I want the new laptop to be exactly as the old one. Geronimo Jackson beastworks@mac.com


First a question, is it a "traditional" MacBook Pro or is it one of the "Retina" display MacBook Pros? I ask because if it is a Retina MBP, then you have a major problem in your plan as the Retina MBP cannot use a "traditional" spinning hard drive and you will be stuck with the SSD.

OTOH, if it is a "traditional" MacBook Pro, then you can install the "traditional" spinning drive....I will note that some might ask why you bought it with a 250 GB SSD rather than with a "base" spinning drive as buying a "traditional" MacBook Pro from Apple with a 256 GB SSD instead of the "base" spinning drive adds $300 to $400 to the price tag for essentially no reason if you are going to remove the SSD...but if you bought that new Mac already, then it is a moot point...i.e. what is done is done.

If I assuming you can in fact install the 1 TB "spinning" drive, then to answer your question...Migration Assistant will basically setup up the new computer completely the same as the new computer. There might be a few minor things that you need to fix (like input a few passwords again or tweak a few settings) and potentially re-enter software license codes. In order to do this, you will need to have the Mac OS (i.e. 10.8.2) installed on the new drive on the new computer...either by cloning fron the SSD to the 1 TB drive or just doing a clean install of 10.8.x on the new drive (and maybe updating the OS afterward). You can then use Migration Assistant to transfer (i.e. copies) all your data files, programs, and settings from the old computer to the new one.

Note that depending on what you plan on doing with the old computer, you will need to remember to de-activate programs (i.e. if you have say Photoshop) and your iTunes account on that old computer if you are getting rid of it.
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#3 User is offline   GeronimoJackson 

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 05:06 AM

View Postsmax013, on 16 February 2013 - 10:31 PM, said:

View PostGeronimoJackson, on 15 February 2013 - 04:58 PM, said:

February 15, 2013
Greetings my fellow Macsters,

I have been a mac enthusiast since OS7. I went through everything through OS9 until Steve (may he rest in peace) put it to rest and brought out OS X Jaguar. All of that over a few years or so on a PowerPC.

In 2008 I went to OS X on a MacBook Pro. I replaced the hard drive a couple of years ago to get more storage space. I put in an Hitachi 7200 rpm 750 GB. This gives me plenty of space and has so far been a reliable unit. I also changed out the memory to 4 GB.

I have just purchased a new MacBook Pro with an SSD of 250GB. This not near enough storage for everything that I have on my older MacBook Pro.

I have ordered a new Hitachi 7200 rpm with 1 Terabyte of storage. My plan is to remove the 250 GB SSD which contains OSX 10.8.2 and put in the new empty Hitachi hard drive. I have a new drive enclosure that I will put the SSD into.

So, now I need to get everything from the older laptop onto the new one. The older OS is up to date with 10.8.2. There is somewhere on the machines a way to transfer from one to the other. Migration assistant. I’ve been thinking, will that work? Will the OS transfer with everything. Maybe I need to transfer the information on the SSD on to the new HD, then transfer data from old to new. I don’t imagine it actually transfers the data, more than likely it copies it.

Once everything is transferred I should be able to swap out the older laptop with the new one and see no change except what ever the new hardware will provide.

Tell me what you think about all this. When all is said and done, I want the new laptop to be exactly as the old one. Geronimo Jackson beastworks@mac.com


First a question, is it a "traditional" MacBook Pro or is it one of the "Retina" display MacBook Pros? I ask because if it is a Retina MBP, then you have a major problem in your plan as the Retina MBP cannot use a "traditional" spinning hard drive and you will be stuck with the SSD.

OTOH, if it is a "traditional" MacBook Pro, then you can install the "traditional" spinning drive....I will note that some might ask why you bought it with a 250 GB SSD rather than with a "base" spinning drive as buying a "traditional" MacBook Pro from Apple with a 256 GB SSD instead of the "base" spinning drive adds $300 to $400 to the price tag for essentially no reason if you are going to remove the SSD...but if you bought that new Mac already, then it is a moot point...i.e. what is done is done.

If I assuming you can in fact install the 1 TB "spinning" drive, then to answer your question...Migration Assistant will basically setup up the new computer completely the same as the new computer. There might be a few minor things that you need to fix (like input a few passwords again or tweak a few settings) and potentially re-enter software license codes. In order to do this, you will need to have the Mac OS (i.e. 10.8.2) installed on the new drive on the new computer...either by cloning fron the SSD to the 1 TB drive or just doing a clean install of 10.8.x on the new drive (and maybe updating the OS afterward). You can then use Migration Assistant to transfer (i.e. copies) all your data files, programs, and settings from the old computer to the new one.

Note that depending on what you plan on doing with the old computer, you will need to remember to de-activate programs (i.e. if you have say Photoshop) and your iTunes account on that old computer if you are getting rid of it.

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#4 User is offline   GeronimoJackson 

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 05:10 AM

Thank you for replying.Holy Smokes, that changes everything.
Actually, I won the “Retina” machine in a sweepstakes. Lucky me. Right?
Right now I have about 399GB of data stored on the MacBook Pro that I currently use. I really love this old guy. But that new one, like a new anything, sure looks nice. Especially the retina monitor. Really, why would anyone “buy” a machine with only 250 GB of storage?
I suppose the SSD is what makes the retina monitor work.
OK, let’s think about this. With the exception of the monitor, the processor doesn’t care where it gets it’s information from. Can I attach the new “spinning” HD as an external and migrate to it?
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#5 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 10:55 AM

View PostGeronimoJackson, on 17 February 2013 - 05:10 AM, said:

Thank you for replying.Holy Smokes, that changes everything.
Actually, I won the “Retina” machine in a sweepstakes. Lucky me. Right?


Yes. Many people would love to win such a machine.

Quote

Right now I have about 399GB of data stored on the MacBook Pro that I currently use. I really love this old guy. But that new one, like a new anything, sure looks nice. Especially the retina monitor. Really, why would anyone “buy” a machine with only 250 GB of storage?


There are a number of reasons...

In the case of a Retina MacBook Pro (and a MacBook Air), the reason would be that since it only takes an SSD and SSDs greater than 256 GB are EXPENSIVE (even a 256 GB drive can be expensive by Apple's prices). Thus, if you want such a Mac, then getting more storage built-in will cost you a pretty penny. So, if you want all the "benefits" that come with a Retina MacBook Pro (or MacBook Air), then you will have to live with at least one major "con" which is that you will likely have a much smaller amount of storage than you could have with a computer using a regular spinning drive. Of course, one of those benefits is the primary strength of an SSD...SSDs are MUCH faster than a traditional spinning drive.

The other reason is that many people don't actually need more than 250 GB of storage. For those who mainly do just browsing, email, maybe word processing, and not much more, then 250 GB is likely still over kill. I know people who don't fill a 120 GB drive.

And for some, a computer with such a "small" drive might be their secondary computer. For example, take the MacBook Air that I am using right now. In a sense it is kind of my secondary computer (I actually use it the most, however). It does have a 256 GB drive in it and that is plenty of room for how I use it right now (I have about 120 GB of free space). I mainly use it for "work" stuff". I do NOT really have any of my music, TV shows, movies, pictures, etc on it. It is mainly for "getting stuff done". I have an older MacBook Pro with a 240 GB SSD in the optical drive bay for the OS and programs and a 1.5 TB "spinning drive" in the actual hard drive bay for all my data files (including movies, pictures, TV shows, music, etc). I can then using some syncing service to sync my "critical" "work type" files between the two.

Quote

I suppose the SSD is what makes the retina monitor work.


Not really. The Retina MacBook Pro likely could work fine with a "spinning" drive, but it would be thicker and slower (in terms of drive activities).

Quote

OK, let’s think about this. With the exception of the monitor, the processor doesn’t care where it gets it’s information from. Can I attach the new “spinning” HD as an external and migrate to it?


There are a number of ways to go for you...

1) This is nominally what you are first thinking...you could put the 1TB drive that you have already ordered in a USB 3.0 external enclosure. You could then install the Mac OS on that external drive and then migrate all of your data, programs, and settings over to that external drive using the Migration Assistant. Once you have that done, you could then just always boot from the external drive.

This is certainly a workable solution. The obvious downside is that you would always need to have the external drive with you. If you only really use the computer at home at a specific desk (i.e. as a "desktop replacement" computer) and never take it anywhere to use as an actual laptop, then this will not be much of an issue. Even if you do want to take the computer somewhere to use, it could still be done...you just have the added hassle of having to take the external drive with you (did you get a "desktop" drive or a "laptop" drive? in other words, did you get a 2.5" drive? this will impact how much of a hassle it is).

2) With this option, you still get an external enclosure for the 1 TB drive you ordered. Instead of putting everything on the external drive, you use Migration Assistant to migrate all (or maybe only some if you don't really use them all) your programs, all your settings, and SOME of your data to the internal SSD of the Retina MacBook Pro. You can choose what you want to migrate with Migration Assistant, so you don't need to copy everything over. You then put the remaining data on the external drive. Assuming that the external drive is a 2.5" "laptop" drive, then you should be able to get a bus-powered external drive enclosure for it. This will mean that you can take it with you if you think you will need data off of it. OTOH, if you put your more regularly "critical" data on the SSD in the MBP, then you could also take the MBP out WITHOUT the external drive when you don't need the data on the external drive.

This option has the advantage of giving you the ability to take the computer "out and about" without needing the external drive (assuming you don't need the data on the external drive).

3) The last basic option is that you basically keep the only computer as your main "storage computer" and then use the new computer as your "active use" computer. The idea would be that you migrate all your programs and settings to the new computer as well only the data files that you actually need on a regular basis (I am guessing that you DO NOT regularly use all 399 GB of that data...if you are like most users, most of that data sits there for weeks, months or even years not being accessed). You could then use the 1 TB drive (you would still need an enclosure for it) as a backup drive for the new computer and maybe even the old computer. When you are at home, you can set up the old computer to be accessible by way of your network, which means you could still get to those other files if you really needed to (there are ways you could even do this while "out and about" assuming you have an Internet connection while "out and about").

With this option, you can basically the new computer without the external drive.

There are some other variations on these basic concepts, but they are kind of the main ways to go.
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