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The iTunes Store at 10: How Apple reinvented the music business

#1 User is offline   Macworld 

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 02:30 AM

Post your comments for The iTunes Store at 10: How Apple reinvented the music business here
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#2 User is offline   clivelangham 

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  Posted 29 April 2013 - 08:36 AM

Lovely!
Now does anyone know how to set free the songs I purchased a while back that are protected and apple has abandoned its program whereby you can unlock them?
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#3 User is offline   CatOne 

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  Posted 29 April 2013 - 10:27 AM

It looks like you can do this at no charge if you get iTunes Match:

http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1711
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#4 User is offline   Ratbruce 

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  Posted 29 April 2013 - 01:15 PM

Quote

Lovely! Now does anyone know how to set free the songs I purchased a while back that are protected and apple has abandoned its program whereby you can unlock them?



I've had success by burning the songs to a CD and then loading the CD into iTunes. iTunes treats it like it's your CD and creates DRM free files. I haven't done it in a while and haven't tried it with iTunes 11.
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#5 User is offline   TimothyA 

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  Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:36 PM

"Analysts agree that the future of music lies not in ownership, but in access. In other words, you won’t have a copy of a song on your device, but you’ll stream it on demand when you want to hear it—essentially the model that Spotify, Rhapsody, and Rdio follow."

So you'll be nickeled and dimed every time you want to listen to music? That will be a pretty huge cognitive shift on the part of the music listening public, which has been trained for the last century or so that music ownership is the way to go. If music is streamed, the possibility always exists that it can be captured for later listening, unless Big Brother takes over control of our use of technology.
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#6 User is offline   Chris Breen 

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 05:21 AM

View PostTimothyA, on 29 April 2013 - 05:36 PM, said:

"Analysts agree that the future of music lies not in ownership, but in access. In other words, you won’t have a copy of a song on your device, but you’ll stream it on demand when you want to hear it—essentially the model that Spotify, Rhapsody, and Rdio follow."

So you'll be nickeled and dimed every time you want to listen to music? That will be a pretty huge cognitive shift on the part of the music listening public, which has been trained for the last century or so that music ownership is the way to go. If music is streamed, the possibility always exists that it can be captured for later listening, unless Big Brother takes over control of our use of technology.


I recall hearing the same arguments when the notion of "pay TV" was introduced.

#7 User is offline   wmckelvey 

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 06:43 AM

View PostChris Breen, on 03 May 2013 - 05:21 AM, said:

View PostTimothyA, on 29 April 2013 - 05:36 PM, said:

"Analysts agree that the future of music lies not in ownership, but in access. In other words, you won’t have a copy of a song on your device, but you’ll stream it on demand when you want to hear it—essentially the model that Spotify, Rhapsody, and Rdio follow."

So you'll be nickeled and dimed every time you want to listen to music? That will be a pretty huge cognitive shift on the part of the music listening public, which has been trained for the last century or so that music ownership is the way to go. If music is streamed, the possibility always exists that it can be captured for later listening, unless Big Brother takes over control of our use of technology.


I recall hearing the same arguments when the notion of "pay TV" was introduced.


And receiving services from your local cable company you are "nickeled and dimed" for each piece. Cable box $, DVR $, Movie service more $, another movie service still more $ and you still can't get rid of what you do not watch, so you are paying extra for that as well.
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#8 User is offline   wmckelvey 

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 06:52 AM

I just finished listening to the Podcast. In it was said that the sound quality was the same from Amazon, iTunes or CD; close, but no cigar. MP3 and AAC do sound fine on small speakers, but on a good quality system you can hear whats missing, well actually you can't and that's the point. Most people no longer notice or they do not care, I don't know which.
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