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Maxtor External Drive Useless After Upgrade to OS X 10.8.4

#1 User is offline   Doggymac 

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 09:15 AM

I recently upgraded my iMac from Snow Leopard to Mountain Line, which has rendered my Firewire connected Maxtor OneTouch 4 Plus useless as Maxtor no longer supports their Maxtor Manager software. Unfortunately I had the drive password protected and my iMac no longer mounts the drive. When I run System Report, my iMac lists the drive under the Firewire tab, but it's not mounting due to the password protection.

I need to recover the files from the drive, and I'm curious if this strategy would work:

1. Buy a new external drive, back up my entire system on this drive.
2. Reinstall Snow Leopard on my iMac (which I believe would require me to repartition the drive on this iMac).
3. Unlock the drive in Snow Leopard, and move the files to the new drive.
4. Reinstalling Mountain Lion via the backup on the new drive?

If this isn't a good strategy, or if there is a better solution, I am open to any ideas.

Thanks in advance!
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#2 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 01:34 PM

View PostDoggymac, on 10 September 2013 - 09:15 AM, said:

I recently upgraded my iMac from Snow Leopard to Mountain Line, which has rendered my Firewire connected Maxtor OneTouch 4 Plus useless as Maxtor no longer supports their Maxtor Manager software. Unfortunately I had the drive password protected and my iMac no longer mounts the drive. When I run System Report, my iMac lists the drive under the Firewire tab, but it's not mounting due to the password protection.

I need to recover the files from the drive, and I'm curious if this strategy would work:

1. Buy a new external drive, back up my entire system on this drive.
2. Reinstall Snow Leopard on my iMac (which I believe would require me to repartition the drive on this iMac).
3. Unlock the drive in Snow Leopard, and move the files to the new drive.
4. Reinstalling Mountain Lion via the backup on the new drive?

If this isn't a good strategy, or if there is a better solution, I am open to any ideas.

Thanks in advance!


If the Maxtor drive was working with Snow Leopard, then yes, your plan should work.

In theory, the alternative is to resize your Mountain Lion partition to make it smaller (by about 10 GB should be enough). You could then create a new partition from the newly available space. Then install Snow Leopard on it. You then will have a dual boot system. You can boot into either Mountain Lion or Snow Leopard. So, you could boot into Snow Leopard to unlock the drive and copy off the files. Then remove the lock from Maxtor drive and/or reformat it and use it as an unprotected drive. If you only use it with Mountain Lion, then you could encrypt that drive using Mountain Lion's built in encryption methods:

http://www.macworld....ntain_lion.html

This method would in theory not require you to get a new drive as Disk Utility in Mountain Lion can resize partitions non-destrucively (there are some limitations, but you should not encounter them in your case). Personally, I would still strongly suggest that you get a new drive to backup the computer BEFORE you do the partition resizing. While in theory you should not need it, it is a MAJOR disk operation and things can go wrong on occasion. Plus, then you can use the new external drive as a backup drive. :)

You can then leave the Snow Leopard partition there if you want. Then you can always boot into Snow Leopard if you need to (i.e. to run a Rosetta based program). And keep in mind that with the Mac OS, you will be able to actually run just about any application your have installed on the Mountain Lion partition when you boot into Snow Leopard. I did this method for a while with my previous MacBook Air. The printer at work did not work with Lion initially (it took the printer manufacturer about 3 or 4 months to release a driver). So, I had my main partition booting to Lion, but had a small partition with Snow Leopard on it. I could still run Word and Excel that were installed on the Lion partition when I booted to the Snow Leopard partition...so I could do that to print (I did not need to print very often, so while it was a pain, it was a pain that I did not need to deal with much).
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#3 User is offline   icerabbit 

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 07:02 AM

Yes to both options.

I second having an external drive dedicated to cloning the system as it currently stands/works, prior to doing anything with regards to repartitioning. One glitch is all it takes to hose the system. Have a clone and verify that it works.

Now, I have two alternative and possibly faster ideas.

A] "Re-install" Snow Leopard onto the new external drive. No copying back & forth required of your current system.

Scenario: attach new external drive, boot from factory / snow leopard disk (c key), internal hard drive will be grayed out for install (detects newer OS present) but the new blank external drive will be listed, use disk utility in the menu so it is GUID partition and osx extended formatted (or do this beforehand via utilities - disk utility ... if you get a blank drive or windows formatted one), then proceed as normal ...

Then during reboot press option key. Pick Mountain Lion (internal) - Snow Leopard (new external) ... and go from there reinstalling the special hard drive utility.

--

Now for something possibly even faster and cheaper, provided no new drive and software is required.

B] Create a Snow Leopard Virtual Machine in your current system. I haven't personally done this in a while, but I don't see why it wouldn't work. I know past the paid for Parallels that Virtualbox is available at no charge. So, that would be another avenue to explore.
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#4 User is offline   icerabbit 

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 07:43 AM

One other thought I had was to install Snow Leopard on a USB drive. But, USB drives tend to be very slow, and you may get into issues trying to boot off of one, depending on the system.

And, the Virtual Machine thing is probably a lot more complex than it should be. Plus, I'm having some recollections of installation and configurations pains with virtual machines, and needing two systems to downgrade OS X, ... we went through this desire to downgrade phase when 10.7 came out ...

Anyhow ... I'd investigate the installing snow leopard onto an external drive route.

Note that, you may have to boot your mac from the os x installation disc that came with the system (rather than with mountain lion open) and install snow leopard onto the blank/new/repurposed external hard drive. I think that's going to be the easiest and fastest.

This post has been edited by icerabbit: 01 October 2013 - 07:49 AM

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#5 User is offline   bastion 

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 02:57 AM

[quote name='icerabbit' timestamp='1380642180' post='1030620']
One other thought I had was to install Snow Leopard on a USB drive. But, USB drives tend to be very slow, and you may get into issues trying to boot off of one, depending on the system.
[/quite]

No system capable of running 10.8 will have a problem doing so from a USB stick. Other than the potential speed issue you noted, of course. Honestly this is probably a much better solution than the nuke and pave the OP was thinking of.

The key (so to speak) is to do a little research and find a USB drive that's decently fast. Branding a product as USB 2 (or 3 if you have a capable machine) doesn't guarantee speeds any faster than what you got with USB 1. The faster speeds are optional features of the later specs; minimally you want to see the "Hi-Speed" or "SuperSpeed" variants of the logo on the packaging or marketing materials for the drive. Vendors that don't support the increased performance aren't going to make an effort to call attention to that, obviously, but vendors who do support it will call that fact out.
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