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Equipment needed to put 35mm slides onto DVD

#1 User is offline   Olaus 

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Posted 12 February 2003 - 09:13 PM

I have many 35mm slides which I would like to put onto a DVD with either audio or written identification on the picture. What equipment is needed? My computer is 6 years old and needs to be replaced. Should I get a dedicated film scanner? Has anybody ever done this as a computer salesman tried hard to discourage me on this project. Thank you
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#2 User is offline   rockinphotog 

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Posted 13 February 2003 - 08:27 AM

Well, If the salesman didn't want you to do it, it's because he doesn't use a Mac and didn't know how. he doesn't sound well informed.
You need to scan your slides. The ideal solution is to get a film scanner like the Nikon LS4000(the best 35mm scanner), which can batch scan 35mm film with a special attachment, or one at a time without. It's a great scanner. Your cheaper solution is to get a flatbed scanner with a film attachment (transparency adapter) to scan your slides.

Second, You need a computer. You can use a program like iMovie or iDvd to create a slide show with text information on it(and music). I'm not sure which one can make a slideshow, but I know one can. Then you need to be able to burn the DVD.
This is possible with any Mac running OSX(Jaguar) equipped with a superdrive.
The entire project will be very simple and lots of fun on a Mac. I have the Nikon 8000ED scanner which is the medium format version of the Nikon 4000 and I love it.
I am still waiting for my new G4 with a superdrive to arrive, so I can create some great DVD's too!
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#3 User is offline   lorenolson 

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Posted 13 February 2003 - 03:38 PM

I agree with the other poster on the choice of scanners. But, you can also get a flatbed scanner that will scan the 35mm negatives. However, likely not as well as what he has for sure. Sometimes you get software with the scanner for this purpose and sometimes not. So, if you end up getting a scanner without the software check into Vuescan. It's a $40.00 shareware program available on www.versiontracker.com. Works very well if your scanner is supported. I can tell you this most all Umax scanners and a few others are not supported. So check Vuescan before you buy a scanner or check and see if the scanner you want comes with software for this purpose.
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#4 User is offline   agraham999 

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Posted 13 February 2003 - 11:06 PM

I have a Canon flatbed with a slide/film scanner...and I have to say it does a respectable job if you scan at a high resolution and you save it in a non-degradeable format such as PICT or TIFF...however when you go to DVD...that file format has to change (unless you are just archiving). If you use iPhoto...it can handle TIFF and PICT files and export them for you/burn them to DVD as jpeg or whatever.
I recently archived a project for a client...used a eMac with a Superdrive...scanned at 600dpi...you can see them at:
http://marthabruinde.../portfolio.html
Since they were originally shot with a camera and then scanned...the quality is good on the large quilt images. The samples to the right look much better since they were taken at a closer distance. And of course we had to remove a ton of quality to get them on a web page...but I think you get the idea. Not bad.
With a dedicated slide scanner (you can rent them), the quality will be very good...and you don't necessarily need a top of the line machine. You can only go as fast as the scanner can scan...and if that is a high resolution...be prepared to wait.
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#5 User is offline   rockinphotog 

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Posted 14 February 2003 - 08:36 AM

In reply to:

But, you can also get a flatbed scanner that will scan the 35mm negatives.


To clarify, for flatbed scanners the attachment is usually called a "tranparency adapter". That isn't meant to imply that it cannot hold color or B&W negs, it's just a generic name.
Any good film scanner will scan all film types color,B&W,negative,positive.
Also, do not buy a scanner that does not explicitly state that it has OS10.2 support and software.
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#6 User is offline   jcmount 

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Posted 14 February 2003 - 09:06 AM

I am currently in the middle of scanning 50 years and about 10,000 slides of my family.
Scanning: you'll get the best results from a dedicated slide scanner. Flatbeds do have adaters to scan slides however it won't yield the best results, they will be web quality. After much research I settled on the Nikon LS4000 with the SF200 slide handler which can feed batches up to 50 slides for unattended scanning.
The Nikon has up 16 pass scanning 4000 dpi resolution and up 48 bit color depth. Combined with the software Digital ICE post processing the output is outstanding, It has recovered slides that are faded, dusty and scratched.
Consider at least Photoshop Eements or GIMP for batch processing like generating thumbnails and jpeg of the pics for distribution. I put the pics as about 1MB jpegs on CD for the family if they want to make a good print of a pic I send then the high res tiff.
With all the scan parameters at maximum the scanned image in .tiff format weigh in at 130 MB. At 16 passes, with all the post processing enabled the scan and processing time is 20 minutes per slide on my QS2002 800 Mhz with 1.5GB RAM.
Decide how the high quality of output you want. If 1200 dpi images are good enough, then a flatbed with adapter will work, any higher than that and you'll need to look at a dedicated slide scanner. Speed and Memory, the more the better always, I'll put 50 slides in when I go bed and by the time I get home from work the next day it will be done.
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#7 User is offline   jbouklas 

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Posted 14 February 2003 - 01:35 PM

How many slides do you want to convert? Is this a one-time thing? You might want to consider going to a professional place and let him just scan them all in and give you the CDs when he's done. I'm not sure how much this would cost, but it would probably be less than a nice high-quality scanner setup. Even if it costs a little more, they take of everything, which saves you a lot of time. Then, with a Mac that has a SuperDrive, open up iPhoto and import your images. Then, open iMovie and browse through your iPhoto library, selecting the images you want. You can record narration right in iMovie on the spot, or you can use iTunes 3 to pick a music background and export it into iMovie. When you're done with that, export it to iDVD 3, which burns it. This is what Apple calls iLife. It's a group of their iApps which lets you put together something just like what you want all in one group of applications that are bundled free with your computer, and are available for download (all except iDVD). Definitely get the mac, but at least check into some places that can scan for you.
-Jim
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#8 User is offline   wally626 

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Posted 14 February 2003 - 06:29 PM

I wanted some 35mm slides scanned so I check with my local camera dealer. There are lots of places to get 35mm negative film scanned to 1 MB JPEGs for about $7 or $8 per CD but a CD for 35mm slides using the 5 MB/image Kodak format was $35 plus $10/slide. Other places might be cheaper but this convinced me to go ahead and buy a Epson 2450 for $400 ( or the same as one 36 role of slides). The quality is not as good as the Kodak format or the dedicated slide scanners but it is good enough for my needs and can scan larger negatives as well. You can get some real impressive detail scanning a 4x5 negative at 2450 DPI.
I thought about getting a 35mm scanner and there are several avaialbe in the same price range, but I needed a new flatbed anyway and wanted to be able to scan larger film formats and the dedicated large format scanners are very expensive so the Epson won out.
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#9 User is offline   agraham999 

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Posted 14 February 2003 - 09:49 PM

Don't get anyone to scan into jpeg. Everytime you work with a jpeg file you lose quality...have the scans made as something like a TIFF file. No matter how many times you work with that file...there isn't any data loss.
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#10 User is offline   rockinphotog 

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Posted 15 February 2003 - 09:53 AM

Remember that the resolution isn't the only thing to consider in purchasing a scanner. Sharpness of your scans can be more important than anything. The bigger the image is displayed, the more sharpness will be important to you.
A film scanner like one of the Nikon's or any high quaity film scanner (nikon are known to be the sharpest) is going to be noticably sharper than a flatbed scan when enlarged.
If you settle for having a neighborhood photolab scan your images, you are likely to be dissapointed when you enlarge them, or pay the equivalent of a decent scanner.
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#11 User is offline   Olaus 

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Posted 16 February 2003 - 07:10 PM

I have several thousand 35mm slides that I would like to make into a slide show as a family record to be given to my grandchildren. Identification of the slides is essential. What is the best way to do this and is a dedicated film scanner worth the extra cost. How many slides could one get on a DVD or a CD and which is the best way to go.
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#12 User is offline   rockinphotog 

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Posted 16 February 2003 - 07:35 PM

An 8x10 300dpi RGB(color) scan is about 20Mb. You can fit roughly 35 of these on a 700Mb CD. I chose 300 Dpi because it is an ideal resolution to make prints from. For a slide show, you may need less resolution, unless you are planning on projecting it on a digital projector (maybe a little more high tech than you were thinking, but it's good to plan for their adulthood, right?).
In reply to:

Identification of the slides is essential.


The Nikon LS4000 35mm scanner (as mentioned above) had a bulk slide loader available. When you batch scan, you are given the option of how to automatically save the files to disk. You can choose the format, such as jpeg or tiff, and you can name the files and choose how you want them numbered. So, you could scan 50 slides and call them, "Hawaii,1982" and the scanner would automatically save each one with this name, followed by 001 to 050.
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#13 User is offline   rockinphotog 

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Posted 16 February 2003 - 07:38 PM

I would go with DVD. You can fit so much more on them, and it would be great to stick it in any dvd player and watch with your family.
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