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Repair disk without install disc?

#1 User is offline   mr.steevo 

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 09:16 PM

Hi,
I am on the road and wondering if there is way I can do a disk repair without my Tiger install disc? Clicking on Verify in Disk Utility I get an error that I would like to correct, but without the disc I am not sure what I can do. Is fsck enough? I'm running 10.4.5

s.
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#2 User is offline   Typhoon14 

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 10:33 PM

Apple's disk utility simply runs fsck. Boot into single user mode (command-S at startup) and type "fsck -yf" at the prompt. Type "reboot" when finished.
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#3 User is offline   cyberhazard 

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 06:18 AM

Typhoon14 nailed it.
A little more info on the subject can be found at OSXfaq
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#4 User is offline   berg 

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 06:22 AM

Hello Old Salt ..
Just wondering ... do you know if there is any difference in the disk check and repair functions of Safe Boot as opposed to Single User Mode using fsck?
Beyond that ... is there any difference in running these checks from the disk? Why does Apple say that running it from the disk is the best option? Does it do a more thorough job somehow ...?
Thanks for any info on this ....
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#5 User is offline   Typhoon14 

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 07:30 AM

In reply to:

Hello Old Salt ..
Just wondering ... do you know if there is any difference in the disk check and repair functions of Safe Boot as opposed to Single User Mode using fsck?
Beyond that ... is there any difference in running these checks from the disk? Why does Apple say that running it from the disk is the best option? Does it do a more thorough job somehow ...?
Thanks for any info on this ....



Nope. No differences. Apple most likely recommends running if from the disc because it's more "user-friendly" than asking people to boot to the command like and type an obscure command.
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#6 User is offline   berg 

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 07:45 AM

That being the case then ... I think that Safe Boot is the easiest, safest and least problematic way to have the average user perform the repair disk function ... I'll keep that in mind in the future ..
They don't have to deal with the anxiety of terminal or rebooting to another volume and searching around disk utility ...
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#7 User is offline   Typhoon14 

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 08:58 AM

As far as I know, Disk Repair cannot be run on the startup volume, even with safe boot...
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#8 User is offline   berg 

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 09:24 AM

Hi typhoon ..
This issue has always confused me ...
From Apple ...
"If your computer won't start up normally, you may need to use a disk repair utility to fix the issue. Mac OS X includes two utilities for thisDisk Utility and fsck."
"If you're using Mac OS X 10.2 or later, you can start up your computer in Safe Mode, which includes an automatic disk check and repair." .... so it runs fsck ... right?
You basically said in your previous post that Disk Utility runs fsck and that its the same as running it in single user mode or safe mode ...
My question was why then does apple recommend doing it from the install disk utility .... It must be different in some way ....
Maybe I've missed something really basic on this along the way .... appreciate any help ..
If journaling is on ... fsck is run on startup anyway .. so are there different levels of effectiveness running it?
Degrees of effectiveness ..
1. Journaling turned on fsck run on startup ...
2. Run fsck in single user, or safe boot mode
3. Run fsck through disk utility on install disk
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#9 User is offline   Typhoon14 

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 10:07 AM

fsck is not typically run automatically when journaling is enabled (see for yourself - reboot your computer holding command-v). Disk Utility and a full fsck scan do exactly the same thing. As I already said, I think Apple just recommends using the CD because it allows you to repair the disk without resorting to the command line.
There is a very quick fsck scan that runs automatically in certain circumstances. It does not appear to actually even attempt to repair anything if the filesystem is journaled, making it pretty useless.
Honestly, fsck is pretty crappy when it comes to disk repair. I highly recommend keeping a copy of DiskWarrior around.
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#10 User is offline   Dan Frakes 

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 01:52 PM

In reply to:

As far as I know, Disk Repair cannot be run on the startup volume, even with safe boot...


fsck is indeed run during a Safe Boot; you can see this in the rc script that's run at startup:
code:
if [ "${SafeBoot}" = "-x" ]; then
fsck -fy || halt



#11 User is offline   maczan1205 

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 02:10 PM

That's interesting - so what's the difference between them?
You can re-run the fsck until there are no more repairs.
What happens in safe boot mode?
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#12 User is offline   berg 

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 02:26 PM

HI there Maczan ...
This is what I'm also wondering .... "disk repair" run on the install disk through disk utility must do more than fsck ...
Because ...
From Apple ..
"If you have problems with your startup disk, you can use Disk Utility to test it for errors and repair it. To repair your disk, you must start up from another disk, such as your Install Mac OS X disc."
"If you're using Mac OS X 10.4 or later, you should use Disk Utility instead of fsck, whenever possible."
So .. are "fsck" and "disk repair" two different things? Or are there as I said earlier ... degrees of effectiveness of running fsck?
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#13 User is offline   Tom_Diola 

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 03:29 PM

This thread might help us Bluetooth Keyboardists as well. If I plop in my mac mini Install disk hopefully my Bluetooth Keyboard will work for disk repair? Currently my Bluetooth Keyboard doesn't work when I hold down the command-s keys at startup.
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#14 User is offline   maczan1205 

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 06:58 AM

From what I can tell . . .
Safe boot - disables some fonts and loads a limited version of the system and runs fsck once.
Using fsck in single user mode or from disk utilities allows you to run fsck multiple times and cover any problems not found on the first run and that perhaps become more apparent due to the first repair - so it can be run over and over until no more repairs are needed.
So my take is they are useful for different problems, safe boot for startup problems and to eliminate non-core system files, and fsck for more in-depth file and directory repairs.
In reply to:

"If you're using Mac OS X 10.4 or later, you should use Disk Utility instead of fsck, whenever possible."


I wonder if this is just Apple's way of pointing out the safest and best practice - it is better to use a utility for repairs that is not on the same drive that you are repairing .
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