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Four ways to Windows

#1 User is offline   MW Forums 

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 09:40 AM

When Apple introduced its first Intel-powered Macs in early 2006, the company did more than just launch OS X on a new platform. It also gave Mac users a brand-new way to run Windows apps. In this first of a five-part series, we outline the options for Intel Mac owners who want to run Windows on their machines. We also look at security and give a brief overview of Windows Vista. more
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#2 User is offline   NeoX 

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 01:47 PM

One thing that should be noted is that you can buy the OEM version of Vista for substantially less then the full retail. MS is allowing companies like Fry's and NewEgg to sell it. You used to be required to purchase hardware components with it but I believe I read they have loosened up on that...
Regards,
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#3 User is offline   kinless 

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 02:39 PM

You may also want to mention that you only need one Windows Vista license if you install it on Boot Camp, and then use Parallels to virtualize the Boot Camp partition.
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#4 User is offline   kungming2 

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 03:24 PM

Another thing that should be noted is that the OEM versions, rather than the retail versions of both Windows XP and Vista cost substantially less than those on store shelves. For example, Newegg.com sells Vista Ultimate for $199 (and it's a full version). And since Microsoft defines an OEM user as someone who "installs software", everyone is allowed to buy the OEM versions.
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#5 User is offline   AlFeldzamen 

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 03:56 PM

Wouldn't it be nice, in an article making comparisons between competing or similar products, software or hardware, in an article that describes their features, in an article that includes a comparative chart, in an article that gives evidence of a great deal of work by the authors in making these careful comparisons, TO INCLUDE SOME INFORMATION ABOUT THEIR PRICES ???
Come on gentlemen, some common sense, PLEASE !
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#6 User is offline   cpoff 

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 04:04 PM

Well we're going to look at each one individually over the course of the week, as we mentioned in this article. So stay tuned.
- cp

#7 User is offline   cweber 

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 06:10 PM

One thing people always fail to mention and appreciate when discussing virtualization is that your Windows C: drive is now a single, large disk image file in the host OS, making backups and failure recovery a snap. It just so happens that this file is around 3 GB after a full install and initial updates, 4 to 5 GB after installing a few apps and files. The first thing I always do is to burn a DVD at this point. If your virtualized Windows XP gets infected as reported by Rob Griffiths, simply trash the existing hard disk image and copy from your backup medium. All it takes for disaster recovery is the time to read a few GB of data.
With Parallel's new NAT there is now one more layer of obfuscation in place, making it even harder for malware to find your Windows. In between the NAT of the home/office network router, OSX firewall, Parallels NAT and Windows firewall there should be enough protection one would think. Still, it's nice to have simple, clean backups, and virtualization makes this dead easy.
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#8 User is offline   KaiSteinbach 

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 03:33 AM

I would like to know how the Macworld Experts tested the USB support. In the table of page 1 it shows "Good" support for both Parallels Desktop and Boot Camp.
My own tests show an USB2 external disk significantly slower in Parallels than in Boot Camp, hence I would like to know if something can be tweaked to increase performance in Parallels.
http://kai0.wordpres...-and-boot-camp/
Thanks for letting me know - Kai.
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#9 User is offline   doh123 

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 03:56 AM

a few issues...
Boot Camp does not run Windows, its just for getting Windows installed and working right.
Saying Bootcamp only supports XP and Vista is true, but that doesnt mean you cant use the software to install other OSes as well. You can use it for resizing and partitioning, and boot loading options... and run Linux, or DOS or other OSes as well.
I also don't like how you are comparing running Windows to CrossOver, as its a very different technology. Might as well stick Cider in your list too. Saying you cant drag and drop between Windows and OSX on CrossOver makes it sound bad, but its technically true because Windows isn't there, you are only using OSX.
but anyways i guess this all works if your really wanting to dumb down your stuff...
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#10 User is offline   bigpics 

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 02:06 PM

Quote:

One thing that should be noted is that you can buy the OEM version of Vista for substantially less then the full retail. MS is allowing companies like Fry's and NewEgg to sell it. You used to be required to purchase hardware components with it but I believe I read they have loosened up on that...
Regards,


And then there are the educational discount prices if you have nearly any plausible connection to a school or university (student, parent/guardian of student, teacher, faculty member, etc).
Let those of us who choose dual OS's render unto Redmond what we are required to render, but not a penny more.
/forums/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
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#11 User is offline   Dan Frakes 

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 02:51 PM

Quote:

I also don't like how you are comparing running Windows to CrossOver, as its a very different technology. Might as well stick Cider in your list too. Saying you cant drag and drop between Windows and OSX on CrossOver makes it sound bad, but its technically true because Windows isn't there, you are only using OSX.
but anyways i guess this all works if your really wanting to dumb down your stuff...


The point of the article series is to provide information for Mac users who may need to run one or a few Windows apps on their Macs. In that context, comparing Crossover to Windows in Parallels, or noting that you can't drag-and-drop between a Windows app in Crossover and OS X, is both fair and relevant.

#12 User is offline   OldCrank 

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 03:06 PM

From the article: "From now on, Im going to need a good security program for my virtual Windows machines. (Friends have suggested AVG Free, for starters.)"
Parallels provides Kaspersky Internet Security 6.0 for Windows XP. From the Actions menu, select "Install Kaspersky Internet Security."
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#13 User is offline   grbear 

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 03:11 PM

I find it particularly odd that the scrolling of a word document is that much slower under bootcamp. From what I understand, Bootcamp actually boots into Windows, not just provide a virtualization layer that Windows can run on. Bootcamp should be quicker. The only reason I can see is poorly optimized video drivers, or the bios (or lack there of) is causing the speed hit.
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#14 User is offline   doh123 

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Posted 18 April 2007 - 06:09 AM

Quote:

I find it particularly odd that the scrolling of a word document is that much slower under bootcamp. From what I understand, Bootcamp actually boots into Windows, not just provide a virtualization layer that Windows can run on. Bootcamp should be quicker. The only reason I can see is poorly optimized video drivers, or the bios (or lack there of) is causing the speed hit.


Well on the machines I've tested on, (Mac Pro with a X1900, and Macbook Pro with X1600) Windows running natively scrolls everything including Word documents better than Parallels does. Scrolls it perfect just like it was any other PC... anyone having issues is probably having a major video driver problem.
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