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backing up MacBook Pro hard drive for replacement

#1 User is offline   whiskeybeard 

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:24 PM

Hi folks. I'm about to replace the internal drive on my 15" macbook pro. I'm currently in the States and I've bought a new internal 250gig drive to have fitted. Can someone tell me the best way to back up my current internal drive? I've got Super Duper and an external FW800 drive. What's the best way to go about this so I can just copy the data from this back to my new internal drive?
Many thanks,
paul.
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#2 User is offline   Typhoon14 

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:35 PM

Well, assuming the external drive is empty, it's very, very simple. Simply tell SuperDuper to copy your current drive to your backup drive using "erase then backup" option (smart backup is the fastest option for all but the initial backup copy). After you have done the harddrive replacement, boot your computer from the backup (hold down "option" at startup with the backup hooked up, and simply select it from the list using the mouse or arrows). To restore you drive completely, simply run SuperDuper in reverse, doing erase than backup back to your internal drive. After doing this your system should be exactly as you left it.
Be sure to test your backup to make sure you can boot from it before replacing the drive.
If the external drive has files on it that your do not want to erase, you will have to backup to a disc image on the external drive. The procedure should be the same with superduper, only selecting the disc image as the backup source and the restore source. I have never actually done it the disc image route though.
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#3 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 03:16 PM

Quote:

Well, assuming the external drive is empty, it's very, very simple. Simply tell SuperDuper to copy your current drive to your backup drive using "erase then backup" option (smart backup is the fastest option for all but the initial backup copy). After you have done the harddrive replacement, boot your computer from the backup (hold down "option" at startup with the backup hooked up, and simply select it from the list using the mouse or arrows). To restore you drive completely, simply run SuperDuper in reverse, doing erase than backup back to your internal drive. After doing this your system should be exactly as you left it.
Be sure to test your backup to make sure you can boot from it before replacing the drive.
If the external drive has files on it that your do not want to erase, you will have to backup to a disc image on the external drive. The procedure should be the same with superduper, only selecting the disc image as the backup source and the restore source. I have never actually done it the disc image route though.


Could not have said it better myself. That is precisely what I did yesterday when I replaced my internal drive with a new 250 gb drive.
The only variation that you could do if you want is to get an external enclosure to temporarily use with the new 250 gb drive. Then you use Superduper to clone the boot drive to the 250 gb drive while in the external enclosure. Be sure to test boot it with the external drive (i.e. select the external drive in the Startup prefs in the System Prefs after you have cloned to it). Then when the 250 gb drive is installed in the MacBook Pro, it should be ready to boot up right away (kind of saves a step). You can then put the old drive in the external enclosure and have another external drive.
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