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How Does Apple TV Work?

#1 User is offline   Rcovell 

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 09:37 PM

Today I was reading an article in Macworld about Apples foray into the movie rental business.
How, exactly would I 'rent' a movie and display it on my TV. I'm assuming that I would not use my iMac, but, would need the Apple TV device. What connections are needed? I also assume that the different capacities of Apple TV reflect the ability to store more movies at the same time. What else can be stored on the ATV? Any other helpful tips?

Thanks, Bob.
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#2 User is offline   Heyoka_Happiness 

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 12:42 AM

http://www.apple.com...etv/guidedtour/

http://www.apple.com...letv/specs.html

It has been discussed here alot and articles written:


{message:id=608286}
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#3 User is offline   Rcovell 

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 09:41 PM

Danny-
Thanks for the reply. The links were helpful.

One question remains: Does Apple TV require a wireless connection? Or can it accept a connection from my internet cable modem? Seems like that would require some sort of browser being built in. I don't have wireless and was wondering how to get content onto the Apple TV.

Thanks again. Bob.
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#4 User is offline   Heyoka_Happiness 

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 10:36 PM

It has a ethernet port but it is designed for wireless with a broad band connection you can access the iTunes store right on you TV throw the Apple TV hardware. Apple TV connects to your wireless network to download content from the Internet, so you only have to connect it to your TV, not to a DSL or cable modem.
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#5 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 07:02 AM

Heyoka_Happiness said:

It has a ethernet port but it is designed for wireless with a broad band connection you can access the iTunes store right on you TV throw the Apple TV hardware. Apple TV connects to your wireless network to download content from the Internet, so you only have to connect it to your TV, not to a DSL or cable modem.

As pointed out, it has an ethernet port. As such, you can add it to your network with either a wired (ethernet) connection or a wireless connection.



From there, you can either 1) stream content to it from upto 5 computers on your network if I recall correctly (the content is NOT stored on the AppleTV); 2) sync content from 1 computer (content is stored on the AppleTV); 3) stream content directly from the Internet (this is for things like YouTube videos and movie trailers...content is NOT stored on AppleTV); or 4) purchase/rent content from iTunes on the Net and download it directly to the AppleTV (content is stored on the AppleTV).
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#6 User is offline   Rcovell 

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 09:39 PM

Thanks.

Let me be very specific. I don't do wireless. My cable modem is located in a basement office and feeds a 'switch' via ethernet. My wife's Mac mini in that office and my iMac in another part of the house are both connected to the 'switch' via ethernet.

So, I'm gathering that if I had an Apple TV setup next to my TV, I could connect it to the 'switch' in the basement via ethernet and rent movies via iTunes without using a connection to either computer. Is this correct?

Bob.
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#7 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 03:03 AM

Rcovell said:

Thanks.

Let me be very specific. I don't do wireless. My cable modem is located in a basement office and feeds a 'switch' via ethernet. My wife's Mac mini in that office and my iMac in another part of the house are both connected to the 'switch' via ethernet.

So, I'm gathering that if I had an Apple TV setup next to my TV, I could connect it to the 'switch' in the basement via ethernet and rent movies via iTunes without using a connection to either computer. Is this correct?

Bob.

Correct.



Now some qualifiers...you appear to be leaving something out. If you connect your two computers to the cable modem by way of a pure network switch and NOT a router, then either you are paying for multiple IP address from your cable provider or your Internet connection has issues on at least one, if not both computers. My guess is that you also have a router in there somewhere...could either be a router between the cable modem and the switch or it could be a router with a switch built into it (which is the case with most routers these days).



If that is the case (that you have a router), then putting the AppleTV on your little internal network by way of an ethernet cable (assuming you can easily get an ethernet cable to where you want the AppleTV...this is why many go with wireless...lack of ability to route a cable to the spot they want the AppleTV) will work just fine. That is precisely how I have mine hooked up...ethernet rather than wireless.
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#8 User is offline   Rcovell 

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 03:35 PM

OK, that's what I was hoping for. Running an ethernet cable to the TV is easily do-able.

About your 'qualifiers'. I'm unable to explain the actual difference between a 'switch' and a 'router', even after a trip to the Wikipedia site, but, the device I have in the basement office is labeled 'switch'. It's made by Linksys and I was told that I needed a 'switch' when we got my wife her first computer and we wanted to hook both hers and mine to the internet. As I mentioned, the cable comes into the house and feeds the cable modem. The modem in turn feeds the 'switch' which has 5 ports on it. We use two of the ports to connect the two computers. So, there is a spare port that could be used for an ethernet connection to an Apple TV. I envision the 'switch' as something akin to an electrical extension box.

We don't pay for multiple addresses, perhaps that's included in the cable companies price, but, I don't recall it ever being brought up. We just switched to a cable modem from the former DSL. Both setups were basically the same, only the modem has changed. And, we don't have problems with the internet connection to either computer.

I appreciate your clarifications. With the Blu Ray/HD-DVD format 'war' over and Apple TV available, there's some interesting choices available.

Thanks, Bob.
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#9 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 03:49 PM

Rcovell said:

OK, that's what I was hoping for. Running an ethernet cable to the TV is easily do-able.

About your 'qualifiers'. I'm unable to explain the actual difference between a 'switch' and a 'router', even after a trip to the Wikipedia site, but, the device I have in the basement office is labeled 'switch'. It's made by Linksys and I was told that I needed a 'switch' when we got my wife her first computer and we wanted to hook both hers and mine to the internet. As I mentioned, the cable comes into the house and feeds the cable modem. The modem in turn feeds the 'switch' which has 5 ports on it. We use two of the ports to connect the two computers. So, there is a spare port that could be used for an ethernet connection to an Apple TV. I envision the 'switch' as something akin to an electrical extension box.

We don't pay for multiple addresses, perhaps that's included in the cable companies price, but, I don't recall it ever being brought up. We just switched to a cable modem from the former DSL. Both setups were basically the same, only the modem has changed. And, we don't have problems with the internet connection to either computer.

I appreciate your clarifications. With the Blu Ray/HD-DVD format 'war' over and Apple TV available, there's some interesting choices available.

Thanks, Bob.

Do you know the model number of the Linksys device? I am guessing it is a router with a built in switch. The other way to tell is to look at the IP address for your computers. If it is something OTHER than 192.168.xxx.xxx, 10.xxx.xxx.xxx, or 172.yyy.xxx.xxx (where yyy is a number from 16 to 31 and xxx is from 0 to 255), then it is not a router and is somehow working. These are private IP addresses that a router will hand out to your computers on your LAN. A router then "negotiates" traffic from the LAN (your internal network of computers/devices) to WAN and vice versa.
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#10 User is offline   Rcovell 

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 09:17 PM

The 'manual' says it's a model EZXS55W ver.3 5 port EtherFast 10/100 Workgroup Switch. The literature does discuss the difference between a switch and a hub, but, no mention of a router.

I didn't look at the IP addresses, I know my device is a switch and not a router, so I'm not worried about it since everything works fine.

Bob.
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#11 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 03:24 PM

Rcovell said:

The 'manual' says it's a model EZXS55W ver.3 5 port EtherFast 10/100 Workgroup Switch. The literature does discuss the difference between a switch and a hub, but, no mention of a router.

I didn't look at the IP addresses, I know my device is a switch and not a router, so I'm not worried about it since everything works fine.

Bob.

Well, it is definitely a switch, not a router.



I suspect that you might have a router built into your cable modem. If not, that I am kind of at a loss as to how things are working as most, if not all, ISPs will only distribute one IP address per modem unless you pay for more than 1 actual IP address...and even then, I believe they would give you a second modem.



The only reason I am stuck on this is that it could effect how your AppleTV will work. If you have a router built into the modem, then it will work just fine. If it is somehow that the ISP is giving you multiple IP addresses, then it might be that the AppleTV might end up being one IP address needed and cause problems.
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